Westcountry Wildlife

Blackthorn – Prunus Spinosa

Blackthorn is one of the quintessential hedgerow species of tree found throughout the South West. Its beautiful white blossoms appear early in the year from February to March, when they are an important source of nectar for insects emerging in this early period. They are also a crucial food plant for the caterpillars of many…

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30th April 2018

Buzzer Midge – Chironomus Plumosus

The Buzzer, Chironomous plumosus, is a species of midge that will be familiar to many anglers on our lakes, as both the adult midge and the larvae form the basis for popular and successful fly patterns for catching trout. Buzzers are often encountered in large numbers, and as their name suggests can make a considerable noise, but…

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23rd April 2018

Brown Centipede – Lithobius Forficatus

Just after writing the blog post for the millipede Cylindroiulus caeruleocinctus, I came across this Brown Centipede while clearing a dead tree from one of the footpaths around Wimbleball lake, which makes for the perfect comparison between the two classes. The flatter body with larger segments, and Fewer, larger legs are dead giveaways. As I mentioned…

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23rd April 2018

Giant House Spider – Tegenaria Gigantea

Look away now if you’re scared of spiders! This fine specimen is Tegenaria gigantea, the Giant House Spider. It is one of the most common species of spider you’re likely to find in your house, and can be quite easily identified by the intricate black and brown patterning on the abdomen. Females are larger than males,…

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13th April 2018

Millipede – Cylindroiulus Caeruleocinctus

While perusing through a small log pile recently, I came across this lovely little millipede, which I am tentatively identifying as Cylinroiulus caeruleocinctus.  While narrowing a millipede down to a particular species is quite tricky, I’m often asked how to differentiate between millipedes and centipedes – and that particular question is much easier 🙂 Firstly, millipedes…

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13th April 2018