Westcountry Wildlife

Yellow Archangel – Lamium Galeobdolon

Yellow archangel is a member of the dead-nettle family, and can be found along hedgerows and in woodlands, where it tends to favour damp ground. Traditional woodland management, where sections or coupes are periodically coppiced to let light through the canopy, is highly beneficial for this and many other species of woodland wildflower. The plant…

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21st May 2018

Lesser Celandine – Ranunculus Ficaria

Lesser Celandine is one of the first wildflowers to emerge in the spring time, and it’s also one of the most cheering ones to see poking up through the greenery after a long winter. It is a member of the buttercup family, as you might guess from the bright yellow flowers… unlike Greater Celandine, which…

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21st May 2018

Garlic Mustard – Alliaria Petiolata

Garlic mustard, or “Jack-by-the-hedge”, is one of the oldest plants to be used to flavour dishes, and it certainly gives off a lovely savoury aroma when crushed. Although it certainly can be eaten, it is not as palatable as ramsons (wild garlic) and I’m personally not a big fan, even though I love wild foraging.…

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16th May 2018

Red Rumex Weevil – Apion Frumentarium

Now it’s no secret that I love a good beetle, and that goes double for a lovely little weevil like this Red Rumex Weevil here! As the name Rumex suggests, this weevil feeds on docks and sorrels, and so unlike many other weevils is not considered an agricultural pest. They like to hide on the…

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16th May 2018

Cuckoo flower / Lady’s smock – Cardamine Pratensis

Lady’s smock is one of the earlier wildflowers to carpet our meadows in the South West, and one I always look forward to seeing after the long winter months. The flowers can vary from pale lilac or pink to almost white, and the slender upright leaves can have a distinct blue tinge to them –…

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8th May 2018